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Tank size

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shortiesrule55
Tank size

I have decided to purchase a new tank for a pair of mustangs. I would like to eventually breed them. I dont have a big budgett or a lot of space. I would like to get one that i can use an eclipse hood for. I was thinking 10-25 galleons. is that reasonable can i go smaller?

carol
Re:Tank size

Hi, I would recommend a minimun tank size of 20 gallon tank for your Mustangs.

Leslie
Re:Tank size

The Ecipise 2 will fit a 20g or a 25g Tall, they have the same footprint so it will not take up any additional space except for the height and you get a little extra water volume.

If you can go a tad bigger the Eclipse 3 will fit a 29g Tall, which is a really nice size for a pair of Mustangs.

HTH,

Leslie

DAVE_15
Re:Tank size

20 gallon or larger should be ok...make sure its high enough for the seahorses to breed. When doing the dance they go up and they need more height for breeding

Naturallygrand
Re:Tank size

Hello To All,

I am not new to seahorse care, although I am new to this forum. What I am looking for is to get different view points on tank size for seahorses. It has been my experience that larger tanks with less biological load are easier to sustain and that water quality does not fluctuate as easily. For example a 29 gallon aquarium that I serviced for a woman had not been serviced in over a year besides scraping algea, cleaning the protein skimmer, and adding water, but the tank looked great. She had about 30 lbs. of live rock and one chocolate clown that was huge. I am not recommending neglecting your tank like that the individual did, but the idea of a large tank with little biological load sustainablity seems evident to me.

Getting to my point, do you think that there a size tank that could potentially be self sustaining for seahorses? Could enough live rock in a large enough tank support a few pairs of Zosteraes? The reason I choose \"pixies\" is because they primarily feed on brine shrimp a minimally nitritious source of food without supplementation. I would assume that the copods found in a reef tank would be more nutritious and provide a replenishable supply of food. Live rock does come with it\'s inherent dangers for seahorses as it can contain predators and other little nasties. Do you think it is possible and has anyone tried this approach before? Thank you for any insight and information you might be able to give.

Leslie
Re:Tank size

Hi Naturallygrand,

Welcome to the forum,

A self-sustaining seahorse system seems like a great idea until you take a closer look. It is really not advisable to keep seahorses in a system like this because they have a GI system, which is tremendously abbreviated. It is relatively quite short. As a result there is not much time for the GI system to absorb nutrients after they have eaten and before they eliminate. Storing energy becomes an issue because of this. As a result they need highly nutritious foods in fairly large quantities daily. It would be difficult if not impossible to maintain self-sustaining natural supply of food.

Pixies aka Dwarf seahorses are quite tiny, at all of 1 to 1.5 inches, I will never the first time I saw them in the flesh. I knew they would be small but the reality hit when I actually saw them. A10g is usually recommended for a heard. They could be kept in a bigger tank but they will be hard to keep track of and food density becomes an issue. They of all the seahorse species would theoretically be the most likely choice for a tank like this, due to their size they would of course require much less food than any of the greater seahorse species. The problem with Pixies is that a reef environment is not recommended. In addition to all the typical predators and other incompatible seahorse tankmates that may hitchhike in on your live rock many types of hydroids are an ever-present threat to these tiny seahorses. Many types of hydroids are barely visible with the naked eye. As a result problems due to hydroids are is often noticed to late with resultant losses and even tank wipe outs, before the aquarist even realizes what is happening. Another problem is that dwarf seahorses are quite prolific so your small heard of 4 will soon multiply and your self -sustaining system will no longer be able to meet the needs of the growing heard.

HTH,

Leslie

Leslie
Re:Tank size

Hi Naturallygrand,

Welcome to the forum,

A self-sustaining seahorse system seems like a great idea until you take a closer look. It is really not advisable to keep seahorses in a system like this because they have a GI system, which is tremendously abbreviated. It is relatively quite short. As a result there is not much time for the GI system to absorb nutrients after they have eaten and before they eliminate. Storing energy becomes an issue because of this. As a result they need highly nutritious foods in fairly large quantities daily. It would be difficult if not impossible to maintain self-sustaining natural supply of food.

Pixies aka Dwarf seahorses are quite tiny, at all of 1 to 1.5 inches, I will never the first time I saw them in the flesh. I knew they would be small but the reality hit when I actually saw them. A10g is usually recommended for a heard. They could be kept in a bigger tank but they will be hard to keep track of and food density becomes an issue. They of all the seahorse species would theoretically be the most likely choice for a tank like this, due to their size they would of course require much less food than any of the greater seahorse species. The problem with Pixies is that a reef environment is not recommended. In addition to all the typical predators and other incompatible seahorse tankmates that may hitchhike in on your live rock many types of hydroids are an ever-present threat to these tiny seahorses. Many types of hydroids are barely visible with the naked eye. As a result problems due to hydroids are is often noticed to late with resultant losses and even tank wipe outs, before the aquarist even realizes what is happening. Another problem is that dwarf seahorses are quite prolific so your small heard of 4 will soon multiply and your self -sustaining system will no longer be able to meet the needs of the growing heard.

HTH,

Leslie

 

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